Mushrooms in Coffee?

Written by Les Dahl on April 11, 2016. Posted in Health, Sage's Scroll

Ganoderma_lucidum_01

 

 

When it comes to coffee, there are drinkers, lovers and connoisseurs.

 

Drinkers want a hot beverage, but not tea or chocolate. Brand, quality, and even taste doesn’t matter much, as long as it’s cheap (i.e. inexpensive) and tastes like coffee.

 

Lovers must have their coffee. Their day doesn’t begin until they’ve had their cup of brew. They savor the aroma, the taste, the pleasure, even the grinding of beans. Coffee lovers are happy to spend a little more on a preferred brand of quality. Coffee is an experience, not just a beverage.

 

Connoisseurs bring art and science to the coffee experience. Knowledgeable and experienced, connoisseurs can identify the quality of coffee and recognize the nuances of its taste. From grinding the beans to boiling the water—actually, the water should be heated between 92-96º C not boiled—to brewing method, connoisseurs are exacting. Coffee is the elixir of heaven—magical, divine.

 

Well, it seems like the search for the holy grail of coffee stills goes on.

 

Various efforts are made to find the added ingedient to create the exceptional coffee experience. From radical selection (Kopi Luwak and Black Ivory coffee) to blending beans from different regions, to unique preparation (Aeropress or Chemex), the choices are endless. After careful scrutiny, the Coffee Review found 508 coffees and espressos that earned an outstanding score.

 

Mushroom-Coffee: A Healthy Blend?

 

One interesting blend of mushrooms and coffee claims to have created a tasty and healthy coffee. The claim is arguable, but final judgement is really a matter of personal preference and acquired taste.

 

Organo™ Gold adds organic ganoderma lucidum, either finely ground or as spores, to its coffee. The result, it claims, is “a healthy alternative to regular coffee that not only tastes great, but makes people feel great.”

 

Medicinal uses of lingzhi are recorded in Chinese texts as far back as 2000 years. The various meanings of the Chinese name—divine, spiritual, miraculous, effective, plant of longevity—shows the respect for this “auspicious mushroom.”

 

Our western mindset views Chinese medicine with suspicion. Scientific studies are proving the wisdom of these oriental herbal masters, however. Each of the benefits of ganoderma listed below is confirmed by research.

 

7 Benefits of Ganoderma

 

  • a natural source of bio-chemicals (antioxidants and phytonutrients) which provide rejuvenating energy and health benefits without interfering with our body system

 

  • calms the nerves and is highly effective in dealing with “environmental stress”

 

  • lowers blood pressure and blood cholesterol

 

  • strengthens immune cells and improves the immune system without side-effects

 

  • as an anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, ganoderma significantly inhibits all four types of allergic reactions and is effective in treating asthma, bronchitis, stiff neck and shoulders

 

  • effective in treating liver failure and chronic hepatitis

 

  • the Beta-D-glucan (a polysaccharide) in ganoderma produces an anti-tumor (i.e. anti-cancer) effect

 

Organo™ Gold Coffee

 

By infusing “gourmet coffee” with organic ganoderma lucidum, Organo™ Gold has “scientifically developed a healthy alternative to regular coffee that not only tastes great, but makes people feel great.”

 

Some of my “coffee drinker” friends won’t even try a cup of OrganoGold coffee. They are not enticed by the supposed healthy benefits (even if scientific research backs the claims). Besides, a cup of coffee at Tim Hortons or a can of ground coffee from the grocery store is a lot cheaper.

 

My “coffee lovers” are intrigued by the benefits of ganoderma—most are in need of support to their health. But, “I don’t drink instant coffee.”

 

As I said before, whether you are a coffee drinker, a coffee lover or a coffee connoisseur, the coffee experience is really a matter of personal preference and aquired taste.

 

Personally, I’m somewhere between coffee lover and coffee connoisseur. Coffee is not just a convenient beverage, it is a pleasureable experience. I enjoy grinding the beans, smelling the aroma wafting through the cool morning air, savoring the robust taste of a perfect roast, and I can taste the difference in quality. (Some of the best coffee I’ve tasted is the home roasted beans from my farmer-friends in the hills of Jamaica.)

 

Research assures me that the cup of java I enjoy has benefit for my health. Now there is a coffee that adds the benefits of ganoderma. I’m interested. I want to live a full, healthy life.

 

Get the Best of Both

 

I drink an invigorating cup of brew in the morning to awaken my mind, my senses and my body to the pleasant side of life. As I start to feel a little sluggish about mid-afternoon, I resort to a tasty cup of OG Black. The unique blend really does rejuvenate my energy flow, and it doesn’t interfere with my sleep.

 

My wife, Miriam, loves coffee, but gets an allergic reaction with just one sip. She discovered that her body has no negative reaftion to OrganoGold. She mixes it into her smoothies or just has an energizing cup of OG Black in the afternoon.

 

A friend of ours, also a coffee lover who cannot drink coffee without severe negative effects, enjoys OG Black with no adverse effects. In fact, she credits OrganoGold for relief from her excruciating migraines.

 

So, I say, “Give it a try.”

 

Unfortunately, you can’t download a sample of OrganoGold. But if you will copy and paste one of the following options into a return email along with your mailing address, I will send you a FREE sample sachet of either OG Black or OG Latte by snail mail. (It will take about 10-15 days to find you.)

 

Option 1:

Yes, please send me a FREE sample of the OG Gourmet Black Coffee. My mailing address is:

 

Option 2:

Yes, please send me a FREE sample of the OG Gourmet Cafe Latte. My mailing address is:

 

Shalom

 

Image by Eric Steinert (Creative Commons)

Resources:

The Sacred Mushroom “Reishi”  A Review by P. Dinesh Babu and R.S. Subhasree published in the American-Eurasian Journal of Botany, 1 (3): 107-110, 2008

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-459-germanium.aspx?activeingredientid=459&activeingredientname=germanium

 

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Comments (1)

  • Carin Martis
    April 12, 2016 at 4:01 pm |

    sounds interesting, but we live in Belgium….

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